John Benedict

Painter

Original Graphic Oil Paintings

and Reproductions:

      While adventuring in the wildlands of our planet, John took a great many photographs of breath-taking scenery.  As beautiful as many of these photographs were, they did not capture the thoughts and feeling that John experienced while in these places.  

     John regards all wildlands as highly spiritual places where their overriding “essence” needs to be portrayed in art.  As such, he looks past the detailed visual clutter that earth’s natural forces bestow upon landscapes in order to precisely paint only the dominant lines, forms and colors of the earth’s features, and to minimize attention to their surface details. 

      Because his focus on precise line and form is blended with the freedom of color that oil painting allows, John calls his work “graphic oils.”  Original oils and reproductions are both available, with reproductions usually smaller than the original oil paintings.  Not all pieces are exhibited at the gallery.  For a full inventory of available art, please see the “BenedictArt.com” website.

Fine Art Environmental Prints:

      While past public comments on his work suggest that many people sense the pure earthly serenity he is trying to present, John has found the need to use his art to encourage the conservation of the earth’s wildlands and waters.  Hence, John has now created a series of “Fine Art Environmental Prints” with brief narratives that describe what he thought and felt while painting.  It is hoped that these prints will encourage the conservation of the earth’s beauty and purpose.  Prints are produced on very high quality, heavy stock (300gsm) E-Satin photo paper using pigmented archival inks. 

Ceramic Arts and Ink-on-Paper Art:

Original Hand Made Pottery:

     Generally, John and Teresa create pottery that has “utilitarian beauty.”  Much of their work can be used in everyday life while adding beauty to a home.  John decorates the pottery turned on a wheel by his wife Teresa.   Teresa does some of her own decorating, but John finish glazes all pieces.  John also does what is known as “flatware” (table trivets and decorative tile wall hangings).  On occasion, John creates some sculptures:  usually on functional pottery pieces. At present, John and Teresa are emphasizing “black image art” on their pottery, which is somewhat like silhouette images, yet containing interior details. Other work includes colored images.

“Black Image” Art on Paper:

      John has started creating “black image art” on paper.  As stated above, black image art is similar to silhouette art except that the images have varying degrees of interior detail that is lacking in silhouette art. These pieces are the original art works that John creates to ultimately develop images for his decorative tiles.




      John’s ship art appears in the gallery on an occasional basis.  Ship construction occurs only every one or two years because of the time involved.  If you wish to view his work, please see his website “BenedictArts.com.”  John’s ship art is not intended to be an accurate historic presentation of any particular ship.  As such, John considers himself a “ship artist” and not a “ship modeler.”  John designs the basic shapes of his ships from historic paintings and drawings, but then deviates from the historic by exaggerating the size and shape of hull details (such as keels, railings/moldings, guns, and sail sizes), while at the same time ignoring details that are non-essential to the inherent beauty of the ships.  John expresses this beauty with finely sculptured or planked hardwood hulls, copper sails, and brass rigging.  John attempts to capture the “essence” of ancient ships rather than just their technical design and functionality.

Ship Art